An Appropriate Send Off – a 100 word story

Below is this week’s 100 word story for Friday Fictioneers from the photo prompt by ©David Stewart

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Friday Fictioneers prompt for March 25, 2015 ©David Stewart

An Appropriate Send Off

As one of only four remaining founder members Nigel endeavoured to pass on the original ethos of the brass band to younger members.
Three rehearsals per week and a strictly traditional choice of music ensured the trophy cabinet was jam-packed.
When his funeral procession passed the bandstand a note-perfect slow march was performed with due sadness. The older members slipped off to the funeral.
Young Dominic took the baton.
A giddy excitement rippled through the band as secretly rehearsed arrangements of Bohemian Rhapsody, Mamma Mia and many more ‘modern’ classics burst into the air.
They played until midnight when the police arrived and asked them to be quiet.

©Siobhán McNamara


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59 Responses to An Appropriate Send Off – a 100 word story

  1. Dear Siobhán,

    There’s always change with the passing of the baton. .I think the new band will win awards of their own. Good one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  2. Wouldn’t you love a send-off like that? Made me think of Dixieland and how people in New Orleans celebrate someone’s life with cheerful tunes. That’s a wonderful picture to be inspired by. Really enjoyed the imagery you created.

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  3. micklively says:

    Is that disrespectful or just the changing of the guard?

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  4. rgayer55 says:

    Fayetteville enacted a sound ordinance several years back (when I was still playing rock & blues). We were playing on the patio of a Mexican restaurant one night and got “too loud” according to the police. Thankfully, the restaurant paid the $500 fine.
    I like the passing of the baton thought. Everyone has to march to their own drummer.

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  5. wildbilbo says:

    Clever story – I really liked the sense of the ‘joy of music’ you get from the younger crew.
    Well done.
    KT

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  6. I like how you can literally see the passing of the band from one generation to the other. Great job!

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  7. I hope the young guard is still willing to mix in a little Sweet Georgia Brown from time to time. The old and new harmonizing. I enjoyed this very much.

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  8. I enjoyed this story, and how you portrayed old meets new.
    But although change is inevitable, it is always good to retain some traditions.

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  9. Sometimes change is needed. I like the path the new band leader is taking. Nicely done.

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  10. I have found that funerals can be quite cheerful sometimes.. I would love such a reportoire at my funeral.

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  11. I wonder if they will still have a jam packed trophy cabinet… I’m sure the baton will be passed down within the judges circle as well, so who knows.
    Great story 🙂

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  12. I agree with Bjorn. That would be a lovely way to leave this earth with happy and beautiful music.

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  13. Margaret says:

    Lovely. I like that they waited until Nigel had passed on. And I’m sure the ethos of the band won’t have changed, even if the repertoire has.

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  14. draliman says:

    Fun! I love the way the younger members were patiently biding their time until they could update their repertoire 🙂

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  15. gahlearner says:

    Heh, that was a great conclusion. Poor Nigel will rotate in his grave. I loved that the police had to send them home.

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  16. Bitter sweet tale, nicely told.

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  17. plaridel says:

    in life, change is the only constant. it’s time for the band to move on

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  18. Siobhán, it’s interesting that your writing, accomplishes exactly what happens with the passing of that baton. The first part of the story, while Nigel still leads the band, has an older, sweeter feel to it. Then, when young Dominic takes the baton, the story, like the music makes a leap to a more up-tempo, modern feel. VERY well done!

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  19. Dee says:

    Love the passing of the baton from old times to modern, your have captured that so well. I can imagine Dominic ramping it up – a bit like Whoopi Goldberg in ‘Sister Act’.
    Well done

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  20. adamjasonp says:

    Got a chuckle out of it at the end. But the blue frog, here, doesn’t do anything. (No link.)

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  21. I loved it. What a great depiction of the passing of the baton.

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  22. I like the idea of passing the baton or in my situation the scalpel to the next generation long before we die. I’m all for youthful innovation. Perfect take on the prompt.

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  23. Jan Brown says:

    I think they should have played just one more night of the old classics, and invited the funeral goers to drop by. But that would not have made for such an interesting story!

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  24. Change is inevitable. Nigel and the older generation did their part by training Dominic and the younger generation. Now they have the knowledge and skills to grow (even if that’s in another direction) and reach more people through their music. Thanks for writing and sharing this!

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  25. Ellespeth says:

    I really enjoyed the fine balance between custom and change. Before we know it, it’s all changed.
    Ellespeth

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  26. dmmacilroy says:

    Dear Siobhan,

    This was bloody marvelous writing. I loved it despite being slightly disturbed by the departed band leader rolling over in his grave. Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

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  27. Times, they are changing. Great story.

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  28. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear Siobhán, Great story and every generation makes their own changes to their job position. Really well done! Nan 🙂

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  29. Well, at least Nigel passed on his love of the music, even though the venue changed somewhat. The fact that the community didn’t complain for hours as the band played on spoke well for the new venue. Good story and well done, Siobhan. 🙂 — Suzanne

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